Connect with us

Movies Review

Film of Year Mah-e-Mir Review

Film of Year Mah-e-Mir  Review 6

In its early years, film was as much about learning something new as it was about witnessing something larger than life on an unusually big screen. Over time, world over, the learning bit has been compromised for the cinematic experience.

If the over-reliance on dialogue in talkies sacrificed the visual grandeur of this primarily visual medium, then innovations in sound design made horror films a mainstream anomaly. Special effects, ironically, made Michael Bay the most successful storyteller of our times, so on and so forth. What we’re left with are remnants of what great storytelling used to look and feel like. Modern day audiences, at large, are unaware of what it’s like to surrender at the hands of the director, both emotionally and intellectually, and witness something that stays with you; like an arrow in the liver, as Ghalib would put it.
The fondness for easy entertainment is even more dominant in our part of the world. The old world has almost fallen in Bollywood with producers, and sometimes even distributors, deciding on film content today. In Pakistan, it has been dead for ages. And the new order is in disarray: our film-makers  today are just eager on putting a film out there just so that they can fund the next one.

Amid all this urgency and confusion comes Mah-e-Mir like a full moon on a dark and cloudy night. Sarmad Sehbai and Anjum Shahzad’s masterpiece stands out among the plethora of ordinary Pakistani films by making the audiences participate in the very mystery it tries to resolve. By cleverly investigating an artist’s romance with his imaginarium in the presence of so many worldly issues, the film will surely become a reference point for both upcoming artists and screenwriters. Whether audiences would respond to the film with as much passion as an artist would, one cannot say.


David Cronenberg’s A Dangerous Method features Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung, played by Michael Fassbender, and his mentor Sigmund Freud, played by Viggo Mortensen. In one of their most interesting exchanges, Jung tells Freud, “There are so many mysteries, so much further to go,” to which Freud responds, “Please, we can’t be too careful! We can’t afford to wander into these speculative areas. Telepathy! Singing bookcases! Fairies at the bottom of the garden! It won’t do! It won’t do.”

A similar discussion on ghazal giant Mir Taqi Mir’s obsession with the moon sets the tone of the film as various critics weigh in on this particular madness of the writer during a TV show. This doesn’t go well with Jamal (Fahad Mustafa), an upcoming poet who is watching the show in a coffee house and in a way similar to that of Jung, he questions this fixation with Mir by making a live call on the show and asking, “Why does Mir not see Neil Armstrong on the moon instead of fairy-like woman?” So begins a film that centres itself around the very concept of madness or vehshat, as the screenwriter interprets it, and uses it to propel debates such as that of the classical vs the traditional.
Dr Kaleem (Manzar Sehbai), who leads that TV discussion, is the torchbearer of classics and a great admirer of Mir. He is the polar opposite of Jamal and, much like Jung and Freud, they too find some sort of salvation in one another, whether they accept it or not.

The genius of Sarmad really comes out when a very literary debate turns into a discussion about the deconstruction of the present-day human condition and how it gets influenced by the surroundings.

The consistent tug of war between reason and emotion is what makes the viewer relate to Jamal’s frustration. Mah-e-Mir uses indulgence in art as an escape from basic existential problems and the artist’s inability to balance the two. Although the solution it provides is a bit dark and gritty for a viewer who has so far been finding his or her catharsis in Pakistani serials, it is nonetheless very honest. On a side note, Manzar’s outlook, too, has stark similarities with Freud. Perhaps, even I am fixated.


The real charm of Mah-e-Mir, however, lies in the fact that, running for a little over two hours, the film stretches but does not snap. All the visual references in the film, such as that of the halqa (circle), the coffee house, the old bookshop and even minor things such as the Rilke book, were justified within the context of the narrative. In terms of cinematography, it does rely too much on close-ups and at places the viewer is left wanting some breathing space, but even that works within the dramatic context of the film: it runs down emotions; hence, the focus on the faces.

The film also carries a very important message for other film-makers: how to use flashbacks sparingly yet effectively. They didn’t seem repetitive and yet, always added some nuance to the narrative without compromising on its pace. Anjum and his actors deserve equal credit for anchoring the film firmly. Manzar meant every word he said and felt every move he made only because it was clear that he genuinely knew what he was talking about. Top that with a gruff vocal texture and you’ll have the best example of method acting in front of you. Paras Masroor as Jamal’s friend, Ally Khan as the ruler of the time and Huma Nawab as Kaleem’s ex-wife appear for a short period but make every frame ooze with their dilemmas. Mah-e-Mir is one film of recent times that has the right actors for the right roles, save for Sanam Saeed’s half-baked portrayal of Naina Kanwal.

Main Focus

The problems with the film are both blatant and well concealed with the moon in the sky. Yes, the central issue with the film is the computer-generated moon, an aesthetic choice that eclipses all the curiosity built around its very existence. With its visual implausibility, the moon never becomes for the audience what it became for Mir.

Although Fahad has proved with this role that he is the most versatile actor of the new lot, at places his recitation of verses and lengthy Urdu monologues seem a little amateur for a film that demanded total control and finesse.

On the other hand, there were major issues of sound design as well. The attention-to-detail given to art direction was exactly what lacked with the sound design. And since the film seamlessly switches between two very different eras, a wide range of musical instruments and a variety of sounds could have been incorporated to make it more dynamic. And lastly, do not follow the subtitles. They are misleading and incomplete. This adds to another point: those who find it difficult to follow Urdu in its purest form might need some help from elders.


Whether you give credit to her makeup artist or to her natural looks, Iman Ali has proved that she is an absolute stunner. Her on-screen persona coupled with the lilted dialogue delivery is bound to inspire. Even when her dance moves weren’t as smooth as that of her fellow dancer, Iman’s role as a courtesan has a lot more depth to it; her eyes speak of the dilemma of the woman who stands at the a crossroad of what she wants and what is expected of her. Between playing a woman who is so powerful that she can make or break a poet to playing a girl who has no will of her own, Iman has proved that, at the moment, she is the only complete package in Pakistani cinema.


Music is one area where most Pakistani films have lacked in recent times. However, with Mah-e-Mir, both Shahi Hasan and Ahmad Jahanzaib have delivered one of the finest music albums of late. The songs not only stay true to the story but also add character to the film. Rajab Ali Khan of Azal fame gives a fresh take on Mir’s Yeh Dhoan Saand his husky voice and acoustic arrangement make for a treat. On the other hand, Piya Dekhan Ko by Shafqat Amamant Ali is a personal favourite for it brings back the Shafqat of the Fuzon days; a Shafqat who could sing as well with the harmonium as he could with a rock band. Shahi has come out of the closet in style and the grandeur of Piya Dekhan Ko will surely silence most of his critics.


Movies Review

Arth – The Destination – Film Review

Writer: Shaan Shahid
Director: Shaan Shahid
Producers: Hammad Chaudhry, Faraz Chaudhry, Shaan Shahid
Cast: Shaan Shahid, Uzma Hassan, Humaima Malick, Mohib Mirza. Imran Momina, Yasir Hussain, Ali Azmat, Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & others.

Arth – The Final Destination (or Arth 2) is the remake of Mahesh Bhatt’s film Arth, a 1982 Indian film which even today is considered a classic for its groundbreaking storyline and powerful performances. This film therefore had big shoes to fill and I must say that Shaan Shahid deserves full credit for not only doing complete justice to this remake in all departments but also giving this classic a brand new identity. Arth 2 can easily be termed as a better and improved version of the original film because Shaan successfully managed to focus on that one character which I felt did not get the attention it truly deserved in the original version while keeping the essence of the original story and characters intact. Raj’s character in the original film was one of the most likeable characters but his journey wasn’t covered as beautifully in the original version of the film as it has been in this remake. The clarity with which Arth 2 has been executed reflects in every single scene; the characters are brilliantly etched-out and the riveting performances coupled with seamless direction and editing make this film a must-watch.

Arth 2 is essentially the story of two individuals who are lost and find their respective destinations in places where they weren’t even looking. The film has a strong message which is in line with its title but is different from the original film. Unlike many other recent Pakistani films, Arth 2 does not try to achieve too much but it stays true to its primary subject which is why it is a clear winner. Shaan Shahid essays the role of a singer (Ali) who loses his fan base as well as his career when he moves abroad. Shaan Shahid breathes life into this beautiful character almost effortlessly which is why you cannot help but feel and root for him every step of the way. Uzma Hassan plays the role of a housewife who also happens to be Ali’s biggest fan. The journeys of both these characters have been told in such a manner that you feel an instant connection with them right from the get-go. Uzma Hassan gives a phenomenal performance throughout; she owns her character completely all through the ups and downs. Humaima Malick and Mohib Mirza’s performances are equally impressive although there are times when you feel that Humaima Malick’s character gets more screen time than needed and it has also been over-sexualized. With this film Humaima Malick proves that she is perfectly capable of giving a solid performance therefore there was absolutely no need to focus on her sexuality so much.

This movie also has some beautifully composed songs to its credit with lyrics which gel in perfectly with different situations. Every song represents a specific point in a character’s journey therefore these songs are not just enjoyable but also unforgettable. Arth 2 is a complete package, a film which you can watch over and over again. It has an amazing screenplay, brilliant performances and it has been shot beautifully. The only disappointing aspect of the film is that the dialogues are mostly in English, there are many times when you want these beautiful characters and those wonderful actors speaking Urdu. That is the only reason why I gave this film 4 stars. I hope that the next time Shaan Shahid decides to make a film as beautiful and compelling as this one, he writes the dialogues in Urdu.

Continue Reading

Movies Review

Rangreza – Film Review

Writer: Akhtar Qayyum
Director: Amir Mohiuddin
Producer: Vision Art Films, MH Films and Malkani Films
Cast: Urwa Hocane, Bilal Ashraf, Goher Rasheed, Ghana Ali, Alyzeh Gabol, Seemi Pasha, Saba Faisal, Saleem Mairaj & others.

Rangreza is essentially a love story and like many other love stories which we have seen on the silver screen lately, this film too has a few social messages as well but unlike some other films which excelled in highlighting these messages while keeping the viewers interested and engaged, Rangreza falls short on many levels. The film is overcrowded with characters you feel absolutely nothing for and the love story doesn’t even start until after the interval. There is a lot of focus on the side characters who have nothing exciting to offer with the exception of Waseem Wallay played brilliantly by Goher Rasheed. Although the character itself is one-dimensional but the energy with which Goher Rasheed has translated it on screen makes it the only performance which stays with you.

Bilal Ashraf plays Ali Zain’s role in the film, he is a famous singer who falls in love with Reshmi ( Urwa Hocane) who belongs to a Qawwal family. The family ties and backgrounds of both these characters are just as unappealing as the characters themselves. Bilal Ashraf’s performance is just as plain and forgettable as his character and Urwa Hocane too doesn’t get a chance to showcase her acting skills. Although there is zero on screen chemistry between the leads but it is also a fact that the screenplay is such that it does not even explore the relationship these two share. Ghana Ali gets a lot more screen time than she deserves just like many other supporting characters. Alyzeh Gabol’s cameo in the film is pointless to say the least! Saba Faisal gives a decent performance in the film although her character too doesn’t have a lot to offer.

Watching this film was like watching an average episode of a drama which doesn’t have a solid storyline and is badly executed. The film does not even have the edge of being visually pleasing and it doesn’t have a single well choreographed song to its credit. Urwa Hocane proved that she can dance really well in Punjab Nahi Jaungi but the director and the choreographer failed to make the most of her ability to do so. The most disappointing aspect of the film is that the leading pair is hardly seen together in a romantic setting. Rangreza has the most unimpressive cinematography and overall it has an artificial feel to it which is why you feel completely disconnected from the happenings all through the film. The dialogues are just as plain as the characters and the story and there are also scenes in which the dialogues don’t even make sense. Overall the film is a big “yeh shadi nahi ho sakti scenario” which leaves a lot to be desired and literally puts you to sleep. Unfortunately such films are the reason why the cinema-goers think twice before watching a Pakistani film!

Continue Reading

Movies Review

Verna – Film Review

Writer & Director – Shoaib Mansoor
Produced by: SHOWMAN Productions
Starring: Mahira Khan, Haroon Shahid, Zarrar Khan, Naimal Khawar, Rasheed Naz, Salman Shaukat, Shaid Mir, Shehzad Mir & Others.

Verna was promoted as a film with a message and it was also quite apparent from the promotions that Mahira Khan and Shoaib Mansoor were the USP of this film. Shoaib Mansoor hasn’t only written, directed and produced this film but he has even written the lyrics for all the songs in the film. Anyone who has seen the trailers of the film must be well aware of the main plot. The question is does the film have enough surprises in store and is it well executed or not? While Verna succeeds in showing the mentality of many of the politicians who are at the helm of affairs in our country faultlessly, it fails to do justice to the other track which covers a victim’s story .  Many of the dialogues in the film have done-to-death written all over them, the kind of things we read and hear about all the time. There are a few hard hitting dialogues in the film but there are so many others which fall completely flat because you hear the characters say those things but you don’t actually feel them.

The trials and tribulations of Sara ( Mahira Khan) aren’t translated on screen in such a way that you truly feel for her. Although Sara’s character is the best thing about the film but there were times when I had a really difficult time connecting to her character. Her strength was admirable but some of her decisions and actions did not go well with the otherwise serious and realistic theme of the film. The introduction to the characters is simplistic and the relationship between Sara and Aami (Haroon Shahid) is probably the worst part of the film. Aami’s character is almost unbearable, his only role in the story is to give people the message that children should be given polio drops. There are times when his scenes are laughable. There is absolutely no chemistry between Haroon Shahid and Mahira Khan perhaps because of the fact that their relationship doesn’t have a lot to offer. The “love” that exists between them doesn’t really come alive on screen which is why it is difficult to feel for them when they are going through hell.

Verna’s plot is interesting but the execution is poor. While Mahira Khan performed well and did the best she could to do justice to her character, there were some scenarios so weak that even her acting did not appear to be effortless. Haroon Shahid and Aami both are the worst thing about this film. Aami’s character is poorly etched-out, he is a disabled man both physically and mentally. I am wondering what Shoaib Mansoor was thinking, did he think that a line of weak characters will make his heroine look even more powerful? This film has some of the weakest supporting characters including the parents from both sides. Zarrar Khan performed brilliantly in the film but his character too didn’t have a lot to offer. There were times when it seemed like Sara was the only wise person around!! Naimal Khawar also did complete justice to her character. Adding a few more strong and intelligent supporting characters would have helped make the film more interesting. Verna reminded me of dramas like Chup Raho and Sangat. This is the first time I watched a film directed by Shoaib Mansoor and the lack of creativity stood out like a sore thumb. He failed to establish a solid relationship between the lead characters which was the film’s biggest drawback. All the songs in the film are meaningful but they are not melodious enough. Even the “happy songs” have not been shot in a creative manner. The director hasn’t used a lot of locations which is why the film has a dull feel overall. Apart from a fierce heroine, this film also needed a likeable hero and more logical ending.

Overall, Verna is neither thoroughly entertaining nor as disturbing as it should have been but at the same time it isn’t as poorly executed as Mehrunissa V Lub U. The script lacks depth as well as clarity. It would have been so much better if Shoaib Mansoor focused only on politics and did not drag women’s rights into the discussion since some of the scenarios are just plain ridiculous!

How many of you watched the film? Do share your thoughts about it.

Continue Reading

Movies Review

Na Maloom Afraad 2 – Film Review

Writer: Nabeel Qureshi & Fizza Ali Meerza
Director: Nabeel Qureshi
Producers: Fizza Ali Meerza & Mehdi Ali
Cast: Fahad Mustafa, Mohsin Abbas Haider, Javaid Sheikh, Hania Aamir, Urwa Hocane, Marina Khan, Saleem Mairaj, Nayyar Ejaz & others.

I am going to be honest, I did not have high expectations from this film especially because of the trailers more than anything else. I was definitely not expecting to be thoroughly entertained and did not expect to laugh hysterically for most part of the film. The trailers and even the songs did not do justice to a film which has a solid screenplay and is shot so well that at times you forget you are watching a Pakistani film. This film definitely has more highs than lows. The characterizations of the three main protagonists are brilliant, their interactions (for the most part) enjoyable and some of the dialogues are remarkably witty.Fahad Mustafa, Mohsin Abbas Haider and Javaid Sheikh own their characters completely right from the get-go and in this sequel are more improved versions of their respective roles. Shakeel’s (Javaid Sheikh) is definitely the most enjoyable one among them all.

What I absolutely loved about this film was that it is a side-splitting, all out comedy. The writers do not hold back at all but at times they even go overboard. One aspect of the film however which did not appeal to me and which wasn’t even needed was the excessive use of foul language, the F word (although muted) is used number of times and there are plenty of other scenes in which the crass jokes are added unnecessarily. The toilet humor makes you cringe a couple of time but there are plenty of scenes in which it is tolerable and even hilarious!

The plot of the film is also unpredictable, the writers couldn’t have given the viewers a more solid entertaining plot. It is however not logical; since this is a comedy film therefore I feel it is unfair to decipher every tiny detail based on logic! I must say that it is one of those very few Pakistani films which has a solid and well thought out storyline which went well with the theme of the film. Like other films written by Nabeel Qureshi and Fizza Ali Meerza, this one too highlights the trials and tribulations of the common man residing in Karachi in particular but the script on the whole will be relatable for any Pakistani viewer since the issues faced by every Pakistani are the same. It addresses class difference and much more. Watching Marina Khan act on the big screen after a long time was an absolutely delight. Nayyar Ejaz is brilliant as Sultan al- Baklawa; it has to be one of his best performances. Saleem Mairaj and the actor playing his companion were absolutely brilliant in their respective roles.

Na Maloom Afraad 2 can easily be termed as a film which is fun and also an impressively “stylish” film which is visually stunning as a whole. The biggest shortcoming of the film is that it failed to include the talented female leads in the story effectively. Like Actor In Law and Na Maloom Afraad, this one too relegates the female characters in the background and does not really incorporate their characters properly in the story. This is especially sad because Hania Aamir andUrwa Hocane both have given remarkable performances even though their characters have not been explored properly. Both the actresses were even excluded from the songs, which I felt was rather unfair because they deserved more screen time. Instead of showing Sadaf Kanwal’s item number, they could have been part of a song which took the story forward in some way. The song “Chal Hug Ley” was also a disappointment because the girls in bikinis could not dance and their bare bodies were supposed to be the only attraction. I definitely expected better from a director like Nabeel Qureshi at least in this context. Urwa Hocane dances so well and Hania Aamir I am certain could have shown her dance moves too if she was given a chance to do so. The songs and the way they were shot was the biggest disappointment in the film.

Overall, I would give this film 3.5 out 5 and recommend it to anyone who does not mind a few jokes which are in bad taste. This film will make you laugh especially if you watch it with a friend. Even with a few shortcomings, you will leave the cinema hall happy because NMA 2 is definitely an entertaining film. The styling, makeovers and the cinematography give this movie a unique and modern look. Nabeel Qureshi’s creativity reflects in many scenes and I especially liked the scene which came before intermission. The background score is also highly impressive. This film has a completely different flavor from PNJ therefore if you enjoyed one, you should definitely watch the other. Those of you, who like me found the gold commode repulsive should go watch this film as well, you won’t be disappointed! There is more to that commode than meets the eye 😉

Continue Reading



Photoshoots2 months ago

Beautiful Video of Zara Noor and Asad Siddiqui After Wedding Shoot

Beautiful Video of Zara Noor and Asad Siddiqui Lovely Photo Shoot After Wedding.

Photoshoots4 months ago

Top Models Amna Ilyas & Hasnain Lehri Sizzling Fashion Shoot

Top Models Amna Ilyas & Hasnain Lehri Sizzling Fashion Shoot  

Photoshoots5 months ago

Can wait to watch this sizzling chemistry between two of our favourites SajalAly and ImranAbbas

Can wait to watch this sizzling chemistry between two of our favourites SajalAly and ImranAbbas  

Photoshoots5 months ago

Beautiful Mermaid Photoshoot of Mahira Khan for Divani Pakistan

Beautiful Mermaid Photoshoot of Mahira Khan for Divani Pakistan   She is a mermaid. No fear of depths, great fear...

Photoshoots6 months ago

Mahira Khan’s Latest Photo Shoot Will Take Your Breath Away

If we could, we’ll stare at Mahira Khan all day long. This woman is the ultimate definition of class meets...

Latest Happenings7 months ago

Promotional Photoshoot of Upcoming film Punjab Nahi Jaungi

Latest photoshoot of Humayun Saeed and Mehwish Hayat for promotions of their Upcoming film Punjab Nahi Jaungi.

Entertainment7 months ago

Sarwat Gillani Sizzling Hot Pre Birth Photoshoot

Pakistani actress Sarwat Gilani recently appeared in a pre-pregnancy photo shoot for Good Times Magazine. Her husband, Fahad Mirza, was...

Latest Happenings8 months ago

Areeba Habib Sexy Shoot For OK Pakistan Magazine

A mermaid theme shoot of Model Areeba Habib for Ali Xeeshan in the latest issue of OK Pakistan Magazine Summer...

Photoshoots8 months ago

Glimpse of The Hot Photo Shoot of Sana Javed For TGIF Magazine

Sana Javed photographed by Ayaz Anis Styled by Raana khan in an outfit and studio by Wardha Saleem. Photoshoot for...

Photoshoots8 months ago

Hareem Farooq PhotoShoot for Miss Veet Pakistan

Hareem Farooq has joined Pakistan’s biggest reality show ‘ Miss Veet Pakistan ’ as a judge for this season. She...